Scotland Football Kit 15-16 Winter Predictions - Sports Betting

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Scotland Football Kit 15-16 Winter Predictions

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Football Cartophilic Info Exchange: Panini (Scotland) - Scottish Premier Division 95

Football Cartophilic Info Exchange

Football cards issued around the world, from the 1880's through to those that haven't been issued yet. Some rare, some very rare and others not so. Alan Jenkins (alanjenkins1899@gmail.com).

Tuesday, 2 August 2016 Panini (Scotland) - Scottish Premier Division 95

Scottish Premier Division 95

3. Badge (Aberdeen)

4. Willie Miller (Aberdeen)

5. Programme cover (Aberdeen)

6. Ground (Aberdeen)

8. Team (Aberdeen)

9. Theo Snelders (Aberdeen)

10. Gary Smith (Aberdeen)

11. Stephen Wright (Aberdeen)

12. Stewart McKimmie (Aberdeen)

13. Brain Irvine (Aberdeen)

14. Paul Kane (Aberdeen)

15. David Winnie (Aberdeen)

16. Colin Woodthorpe (Aberdeen)

17. Brian Grant (Aberdeen)

18. Ray McKinnon (Aberdeen)

19. Scott Booth (Aberdeen)

20. Billy Dodds (Aberdeen)

21. Peter Hetherston (Aberdeen)

22. Eoin Jess (Aberdeen)

23. Joe Miller (Aberdeen)

24. Duncan Shearer (Aberdeen)

25. Ray McKinnon (Aberdeen)

26. Stephen Wright (Aberdeen)

27. Michael Watt (Aberdeen)

28. Billy Dodds (Aberdeen)

29. Kit (Aberdeen)

30. Hugh Robertson (Aberdeen)

31. Scott Booth (Aberdeen)

32. Stewart McKimmie (Aberdeen)

33. Badge (Glasgow Celtic)

34. Tommy Burns (Glasgow Celtic)

35. Programme cover (Glasgow Celtic)

36. Ground (Glasgow Celtic)

37. Kit (Glasgow Celtic)

38. Team (Glasgow Celtic)

39. Pat Bonner (Glasgow Celtic)

40. Gordon Marshall (Glasgow Celtic)

41. Tom Boyd (Glasgow Celtic)

42. Tosh McKinlay (Glasgow Celtic)

43. Willie Falconer (Glasgow Celtic)

44. Mike Galloway (Glasgow Celtic)

45. Peter Grant (Glasgow Celtic)

46. Mark McNally (Glasgow Celtic)

47. Tony Mowbray (Glasgow Celtic)

48. John Collins (Glasgow Celtic)

49. Paul McStay (Glasgow Celtic)

50. Brian O'Neill (Glasgow Celtic)

51. Simon Donnelly (Glasgow Celtic)

52. Charlie Nicholas (Glasgow Celtic)

53. Phil O'Donnell (Glasgow Celtic)

54. Andy Walker (Glasgow Celtic)

55. Simon Donnelly (Glasgow Celtic)

56. John Collins (Glasgow Celtic)

57. Lee Martin (Glasgow Celtic)

58. Paul McStay (Glasgow Celtic)

59. Kit (Glasgow Celtic)

60. Simon Donnelly (Glasgow Celtic)

61. Gordon Marshall (Glasgow Celtic)

62. Mike Galloway (Glasgow Celtic)

63. Badge (Dundee United)

64. Ivan Golac (Dundee United)

65. Programme cover (Dundee United)

66. Ground (Dundee United)

67. Kit (Dundee United)

68. Team (Dundee United)

69. Kelham O'Hanlon (Dundee United)

70. Gary Bollan (Dundee United)

71. Maurice Malpas (Dundee United)

72. Alec Clelland (Dundee United)

73. Brian Welsh (Dundee United)

74. Gordan Petric (Dundee United)

75. David Bowman (Dundee United)

76. David Hannah (Dundee United)

77. Billy McKinlay (Dundee United)

78. Craig Brewster (Dundee United)

79. Paddy Connolly (Dundee United)

80. Scott Crabbe (Dundee United)

81. Christian Dailly (Dundee United)

82. Andy McLaren (Dundee United)

83. Jerren Nixon (Dundee United)

84. Dragutin Ristic (Dundee United)

85. Andy McLaren (Dundee United)

86. Billy McKinlay (Dundee United)

87. Christian Dailly (Dundee United)

88. Craig Brewster (Dundee United)

89. Kit (Dundee United)

90. David Hannah (Dundee United)

91. Maurice Malpas (Dundee United)

92. Brian Welsh (Dundee United)

93. Badge (Falkirk)

94. Jim Jeffries (Falkirk)

95. Programme cover (Falkirk)

96. Ground (Falkirk)

98. Team (Falkirk)

99. Tony Parks (Falkirk)

100. Billy Lamont (Falkirk)

101. John Clark (Falkirk)

102. Neil Oliver (Falkirk)

103. Tommy McQueen (Falkirk)

104. John Hugues (Falkirk)

105. Joe McLaughlin (Falkirk)

106. David Weir (Falkirk)

107. Steve Fulton (Falkirk)

108. Colin McDonald (Falkirk)

109. Jamie McGowan (Falkirk)

110. Scott McKenzie (Falkirk)

111. Eddie May (Falkirk)

112. Brian Rice (Falkirk)

113. Colin Cramb (Falkirk)

114. Nicky Henderson (Falkirk)

115. Jamie McGowan (Falkirk)

116. Eddie May (Falkirk)

117. Richard Cadette (Falkirk)

118. Brian Rice (Falkirk)

119. Kit (Falkirk)

120. Colin McDougald (Falkirk)

121. David Weir (Falkirk)

122. StephenFulton (Falkirk)

123. Badge (Heart of Midlothian)

124. Tommy McLean (Heart of Midlothian)

125. Programme cover (Heart of Midlothian)

126. Ground (Heart of Midlothian)

127. Kit (Heart of Midlothian)

128. Team (Heart of Midlothian)

129. Henry Smith (Heart of Midlothian)

130. Steven Frail (Heart of Midlothian)

131. Neil Berry (Heart of Midlothian)

132. Craig Levein (Heart of Midlothian)

133. Dave McPherson (Heart of Midlothian)

134. Alan Johnston (Heart of Midlothian)

135. Scott Leitch (Heart of Midlothian)

136. Gary Locke (Heart of Midlothian)

137. Gary Mackay (Heart of Midlothian)

138. John Millar (Heart of Midlothian)

139. John Robertson (Heart of Midlothian)

140. Colin Miller (Heart of Midlothian)

141. George Wright (Heart of Midlothian)

142. John Colquhoun (Heart of Midlothian)

143. Maurice Johnston (Heart of Midlothian)

144. Kevin Thomas (Heart of Midlothian)

145. Maurice Johnston (Heart of Midlothian)

146. Gary Mackay (Heart of Midlothian)

147. Henry Smith (Heart of Midlothian)

148. John Colquhoun (Heart of Midlothian)

149. Kit (Heart of Midlothian)

150. Alan Johnston (Heart of Midlothian)

151. John Robertson (Heart of Midlothian)

152. Tosh McKinley (Heart of Midlothian)

153. Badge (Hibernian)

154. Alex Miller (Hibernian)

155. Programme cover (Hibernian)

156. Ground (Hibernian)

157. Kit (Hibernian)

158. Team (Hibernian)

159. Jim Leighton (Hibernian)

160. Steven Tweed (Hibernian)

161. Graeme Love (Hibernian)

162. Graham Mitchell (Hibernian)

163. Willie Miller (Hibernian)

164. Dave Beaumont (Hibernian)

165. Gordon Hunter (Hibernian)

166. David Farrell (Hibernian)

167. Brian Hamilton (Hibernian)

168. Michael O'Neill (Hibernian)

169. Michael Weir (Hibernian)

170. Gareth Evans (Hibernian)

171. Bill Findlay (Hibernian)

172. Darren Jackson (Hibernian)

173. Kevin McAllister (Hibernian)

174. Keith Wright (Hibernian)

175. Darren Jackson (Hibernian)

176. Gareth Evans (Hibernian)

177. Jim Leighton (Hibernian)

178. Kit (Hibernian)

179. Kevin Harper (Hibernian)

180. Darren Jackson (Hibernian)

181. Steven Tweed (Hibernian)

182. Badge (Kilmarnock)

183. Alex Totten (Kilmarnock)

184. Programme cover (Kilmarnock)

185. Ground (Kilmarnock)

186. Kit (Kilmarnock)

187. Team (Kilmarnock)

188. Bobby Geddes (Kilmarnock)

189. Tom Black (Kilmarnock)

190. Robert Connor (Kilmarnock)

191. Raymond Montgomerie (Kilmarnock)

192. Jim Lauchlan (Kilmarnock)

193. Andy Millen (Kilmarnock)

194. Neil Whitworth (Kilmarnock)

195. John Henry (Kilmarnock)

196. Angus MacPherson (Kilmarnock)

197. Steve Maskrey (Kilmarnock)

198. Ally Mitchell (Kilmarnock)

199. Mark Reilly (Kilmarnock)

200. Mark Skilling (Kilmarnock)

201. Tom Brown (Kilmarnock)

202. Colin McKee (Kilmarnock)

203. Bobby Williamson (Kilmarnock)

204. Raymond Montgomerie (Kilmarnock)

205. Mark Reilly (Kilmarnock)

206. Bobby Williamson (Kilmarnock)

207. Neil Whitworth (Kilmarnock)

208. Kit (Kilmarnock)

209. Neil Whitworth (Kilmarnock)

210. John Henry (Kilmarnock)

211. Ally Mitchell (Kilmarnock)

212. Badge (Motherwell)

213. Alex McLeish (Motherwell)

214. Programme cover (Motherwell)

215. Ground (Motherwell)

216. Kit (Motherwell)

217. Team (Motherwell)

218. Steven Woods (Motherwell)

219. Rob McKinnon (Motherwell)

220. Rab Shannon (Motherwell)

221. Miodrag Krivokapic (Motherwell)

222. Chris McCart (Motherwell)

223. Alex McLeish (Motherwell)

224. Brian Martin (Motherwell)

225. John Philliben (Motherwell)

226. Billy Davies (Motherwell)

227. Jamie Dolan (Motherwell)

228. Steve Kirk (Motherwell)

229. Paul Lambert (Motherwell)

230. Andy Roddie (Motherwell)

231. Dougie Arnott (Motherwell)

232. Tommy Coyne (Motherwell)

233. Paul McGrillen (Motherwell)

234. Steve Kirk (Motherwell)

235. Rob McKinnon (Motherwell)

236. Brian Martin (Motherwell)

237. Kit (Motherwell)

238. Alex Burns (Motherwell)

239. Dougie Arnott (Motherwell)

239. Rab Shannon (Motherwell)

240. John Philliben (Motherwell)

241. Badge (Partick Thistle)

242. Jim Lambie (Partick Thistle)

243. Programme cover (Partick Thistle)

244. Ground (Partick Thistle)

245. Kit (Partick Thistle)

246. Team (Partick Thistle)

247. Craig Nelson (Partick Thistle)

248. David Byrne (Partick Thistle)

249. Calum Milne (Partick Thistle)

250. Bobby Law (Partick Thistle)

251. Willie Jamieson (Partick Thistle)

252. Grant Tierney (Partick Thistle)

253. Gragg Watson (Partick Thistle)

254. Ian Cameron (Partick Thistle)

255. Chic Charnley (Partick Thistle)

256. Albert Craig (Partick Thistle)

257. Derek McWilliams (Partick Thistle)

258. Tom Smith (Partick Thistle)

259. Alex Taylor (Partick Thistle)

260. Isaac English (Partick Thistle)

261. Andy Gibson (Partick Thistle)

262. Roddy Grant (Partick Thistle)

263. Albert Craig (Partick Thistle)

264. Chic Charnley (Partick Thistle)

265. Roddy Grant (Partick Thistle)

266. Albert Craig (Partick Thistle)

267. Kit (Partick Thistle)

268. Tom Smith (Partick Thistle)

269. Gregg Watson (Partick Thistle)

270. Willie Jamieson (Partick Thistle)

271. Badge (Glasgow Rangers)

272. Walter Smith (Glasgow Rangers)

273. Programme cover (Glasgow Rangers)

274. Ground (Glasgow Rangers)

275. Kit (Glasgow Rangers)

276. Team (Glasgow Rangers)

277. Andy Goram (Glasgow Rangers)

278. John Brown (Glasgow Rangers)

279. David Robertson (Glasgow Rangers)

280. Basile Boli (Glasgow Rangers)

281. Richard Gough (Glasgow Rangers)

282. Alan McLaren (Glasgow Rangers)

283. Ian Ferguson (Glasgow Rangers)

284. Michael Laudrup (Glasgow Rangers)

285. Stuart McCall (Glasgow Rangers)

286. Craig Moore (Glasgow Rangers)

287. Neil Murray (Glasgow Rangers)

288. Trevor Steven (Glasgow Rangers)

289. Gordon Durie (Glasgow Rangers)

290. Mark Hateley (Glasgow Rangers)

291. Ally McCoist (Glasgow Rangers)

292. Alexei Mikhailitchenko (Glasgow Rangers)

293. Charlie Miller (Glasgow Rangers)

294. Michael Laudrup (Glasgow Rangers)

295. Stuart McCall (Glasgow Rangers)

296. Ally McCoist (Glasgow Rangers)

297. Kit (Glasgow Rangers)

298. Charlie Miller (Glasgow Rangers)

299. Michael Laudrup (Glasgow Rangers)

300. Basile Boli (Glasgow Rangers)

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Χρυσή Συλλογή - Europe's Champions 2016-17

Colin Campbell (footballer, born 1956)

Colin Campbell (footballer, born 1956) Career [ edit ]

Campbell was born on the island of Benbecula in the Outer Hebrides. He began his football career in local amateur football, making his debut for the Benbecula team aged just ten. [1] He later played for Harris and helped them to the Lewis and Harris Football League title in 1978. [1] By this time Campbell was a student at Edinburgh University and while playing for the university football team he was recommended to Hibernian, signing for them in the summer of 1978. [1] Making his debut in October that year, Campbell finished the season with a Scottish Cup runners-up medal. After a second season with Hibs ended in relegation, Campbell moved to Dundee United but played just four times during the 1980-81 season. Campbell moved to Airdrieonians and, despite being in the Premier Division, dropped down to part-time football to combine working in his own sports shop. A short spell with Meadowbank Thistle followed before he "more or less stopped playing at 28", [1] although he did subsequently appear for Spartans in the East of Scotland Football League.

Honours [ edit ]
  • Scottish Cup Runner-up: 1
1978-79 References [ edit ]
  1. ^ abcd"Field of Memories - Colin Campbell". Stornoway Gazette. 23 November 2006.  
External links [ edit ]

1. Benbecula – Benbecula is an island of the Outer Hebrides, in the Atlantic Ocean off the west coast of Scotland. In the 2011 census it had a resident population of 1,303. It forms part of the area administered by Comhairle nan Eilean Siar or the Western Isles Council, the first written record of the name is as Beanbeacla in 1449. Historically this name is assumed to derive from Peighinn nam Fadhla pennyland of the fords as the island is essentially flat, through a process of language assimilation, the sequence has resulted in the modern pronunciation of. The spelling variations faola and fadhla are due to merger of /ɤ/ with /ɯ/ in certain Gaelic dialects. Spelling variants include, Beinn a Bhaoghla, Beinn na Faoghla, Beinn na bhFadhla, Beinn nam Fadhla, the second element is a loan from Norse vaðil ford which was borrowed as Gaelic fadhail. Through the process of reverse lenition fadhla, with the ethnonymic suffix -ach has led to the formation of Badhlach a person from Benbecula. Other interpretations that have been suggested over the years are Beinn Bheag a bhFaodhla, supposedly meaning the mountain of the ford and Beinn a Bhuachaille. The island is known in Gaelic poetry as An t-Eilean Dorcha the dark island. The well-known tune The Dark Island was written by accordionist Iain MacLachlan from Benbecula, the island is about 12 km from west to east and a similar distance from north to south. It lies between the islands of North Uist and South Uist, it is connected to both by road causeways, travel to any of the other Hebridean islands, or to the British mainland, is by air or sea. Benbecula Airport on the island has daily flights to Glasgow, Stornoway, a direct service to Inverness was introduced in 2006 but discontinued in May 2007. Ferry services from the islands of Berneray and Eriskay connect to the other Outer Hebridean islands of Harris, there is a dense cluster of lochs across almost the entire island, and almost all of the island is below 20 metres in altitude. Benbeculas main settlement is Balivanich in the northwest, the village is also home to the airport and the islands bank. Other settlements include Craigstrome, a hamlet in the south-east of Benbecula. In contrast to the cultivated west coast of the island, the eastern half is a mixture of freshwater lochs, moorland, bog, Craigstrome is near Ruabhal, Benbeculas highest hill at 124 metres. The township of Lionacleit houses the Uists main secondary school, which doubles as a community centre, with a swimming pool, cafeteria, sports facilities, a small museum. Next door to this is the Lionacleit campus of Lews Castle College, Lionacleit lies on the west coast road, about 1 mile from its junction with the north-south spinal road near Creagorry

2. Scotland – Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain. It shares a border with England to the south, and is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands, including the Northern Isles, the Kingdom of Scotland emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages and continued to exist until 1707. By inheritance in 1603, James VI, King of Scots, became King of England and King of Ireland, Scotland subsequently entered into a political union with the Kingdom of England on 1 May 1707 to create the new Kingdom of Great Britain. The union also created a new Parliament of Great Britain, which succeeded both the Parliament of Scotland and the Parliament of England. Within Scotland, the monarchy of the United Kingdom has continued to use a variety of styles, titles, the legal system within Scotland has also remained separate from those of England and Wales and Northern Ireland, Scotland constitutes a distinct jurisdiction in both public and private law. Glasgow, Scotlands largest city, was one of the worlds leading industrial cities. Other major urban areas are Aberdeen and Dundee, Scottish waters consist of a large sector of the North Atlantic and the North Sea, containing the largest oil reserves in the European Union. This has given Aberdeen, the third-largest city in Scotland, the title of Europes oil capital, following a referendum in 1997, a Scottish Parliament was re-established, in the form of a devolved unicameral legislature comprising 129 members, having authority over many areas of domestic policy. Scotland is represented in the UK Parliament by 59 MPs and in the European Parliament by 6 MEPs, Scotland is also a member nation of the British–Irish Council, and the British–Irish Parliamentary Assembly. Scotland comes from Scoti, the Latin name for the Gaels, the Late Latin word Scotia was initially used to refer to Ireland. By the 11th century at the latest, Scotia was being used to refer to Scotland north of the River Forth, alongside Albania or Albany, the use of the words Scots and Scotland to encompass all of what is now Scotland became common in the Late Middle Ages. Repeated glaciations, which covered the land mass of modern Scotland. It is believed the first post-glacial groups of hunter-gatherers arrived in Scotland around 12,800 years ago, the groups of settlers began building the first known permanent houses on Scottish soil around 9,500 years ago, and the first villages around 6,000 years ago. The well-preserved village of Skara Brae on the mainland of Orkney dates from this period and it contains the remains of an early Bronze Age ruler laid out on white quartz pebbles and birch bark. It was also discovered for the first time that early Bronze Age people placed flowers in their graves, in the winter of 1850, a severe storm hit Scotland, causing widespread damage and over 200 deaths. In the Bay of Skaill, the storm stripped the earth from a large irregular knoll, when the storm cleared, local villagers found the outline of a village, consisting of a number of small houses without roofs. William Watt of Skaill, the laird, began an amateur excavation of the site, but after uncovering four houses

3. Midfielder – A midfielder is an association football position. Midfielders are generally positioned on the field between their teams defenders and forwards, some midfielders play a disciplined defensive role, breaking up attacks, and are otherwise known as defensive midfielders. Others blur the boundaries, being mobile and efficient in passing, they are commonly referred to as deep-lying midfielders, play-makers, box-to-box. The number of midfielders on a team and their assigned roles depends on the teams formation, most managers assign at least one midfielder to disrupt the opposing teams attacks, while others may be tasked with creating goals, or have equal responsibilities between attack and defence. Midfielders are the players who typically travel the greatest distance during a match, central or centre midfielders are players whose role is divided roughly equally between attack and defence. When the opposing team has the ball, a midfielder may drop back to protect the goal or move forward. The 4–3–3 and 4–5–1 formations each use three central midfielders, the 4−4−2 formation may use two central midfielders, and in the 4–2–3–1 formation one of the two deeper midfielders may be a central midfielder. The term box-to-box midfielder refers to central midfielders who have abilities and are skilled at both defending and attacking. These players can track back to their own box to make tackles and block shots. A good box-to-box midfielder needs good passing, vision, control, stamina, tackling and marking in defence, left and right midfielders have a role balanced between attack and defence, similar to that of central midfielders, but they are positioned closer to the touchlines of the pitch. They may be asked to cross the ball into the penalty area to make scoring chances for their teammates. Common modern formations that include left and right midfielders are the 4−4−2, the 4−4−1−1, the 4–2–3–1, a notable example of a right midfielder is David Beckham. Defensive midfielders are players who focus on protecting their teams goal. These players may defend a zone in front of their teams defence, defensive midfielders may also move to the full-back or centre-back positions if those players move forward to join in an attack. Sergio Busquets described his attitude, The coach knows that I am an obedient player who likes to help out and if I have to run to the wing to cover someones position, great. A good defensive midfielder needs good positional awareness, anticipation of play, marking, tackling, interceptions, passing and great stamina. A holding or deep-lying midfielder stays close to their teams defence, a player in this role will try to protect their goal by disrupting the opponents attacking moves and stopping long shots on the goal. The holding midfielder may also have responsibilities when their team has the ball and this player will make mostly short and simple passes to more attacking members of their team but may try some more difficult passes depending on the teams strategy

4. Edinburgh University A.F.C. – Edinburgh University Association Football Club are a football club representing the University of Edinburgh. Established in 1878, they are third oldest club in East of Scotland football and have been a member of the Scottish Football Association since that year, Edinburgh University are eligible to compete in the Scottish Cup every season as they are full members of the SFA. The clubs present home is at Peffermill, where it has played since its move from Canal Field in 1978, the Club won its first trophy, the Edinburgh Shield in 1883. Historically it is the most successful footballing university in Scotland, the most recent achievements of the club include winning the East of Scotland Qualifying Cup in 2005, and finishing in second position in the East of Scotland Premier Division in 2007–08. In October 2006, the side beat Vale of Leithen 3–0 to reach the first round proper of the Scottish Cup for the first time since 1972–73. In November 2006, they defeated Keith to proceed to the round of the Scottish Cup for only the second time in the clubs history. The teams 2006 cup run was halted by Cowdenbeath, who defeated the university 5–1 at Central Park on 9 December 2006, after the Scottish Qualifying Cup was abolished, Edinburgh University gained direct entry to the Scottish Cup as a full member of the SFA. Receiving a random bye in the first round, Edinburgh University beat Deveronvale in the round before losing to Cove Rangers in the third round. The club was admitted to the Lowland Football League from the 2014–15 season

5. Hibernian F.C. – It is one of three SPFL clubs in the city, the others being their Edinburgh derby rivals Hearts and Edinburgh City. Hibernian was founded in 1875 by Irish immigrants, but support for the club is now based on rather than ethnicity or religion. The Irish heritage of Hibernian is still reflected, however, in its name, colours, the name of the club is usually shortened to Hibs. The team are also called The Hibees and The Cabbage, a shortening of the slang for Hibs of Cabbage and Ribs, by fans of the club. Home matches are played at the Easter Road stadium, in use since 1893, Hibernian have played in the second tier of the Scottish football league system, known as the Scottish Championship, since being relegated in 2014. Hibernian have won the Scottish league championship four times, most recently in 1952, three of those four championships were won between 1948 and 1952, when the club had the services of The Famous Five, a notable forward line. The club have won the Scottish Cup three times, in 1887,1902 and 2016, Hibs have also won the Scottish League Cup three times, in 1972,1991 and 2007. The club was founded in 1875 by Irishmen from the Cowgate area of Edinburgh, the name is derived from Hibernia, the Roman name for Ireland. James Connolly, the famous Irish Republican leader, was a Hibs fan, there was some sectarian resistance initially to an Irish club participating in Scottish football, but Hibs established themselves as a force in Scottish football in the 1880s. Hibs were the first club from the east coast of Scotland to win a major trophy and they went on to defeat Preston North End, who had won the 1887 FA Cup, in a friendly match described as the Association Football Championship of the World Decider. Mismanagement over the few years led to Hibs becoming homeless. A lease on the Easter Road site was acquired in late 1892, despite this interruption, the club today views the period since 1875 as one continued history and therefore counts the honours won between 1875 and 1891, including the 1887 Scottish Cup. The club were admitted to the Scottish Football League in 1893, a significant change at this time was that players were no longer required to be members of the Catholic Young Mens Society. Hibs are not seen today as being an Irish or Roman Catholic institution, for instance, the Irish harp was only re-introduced to the club badge when it was last re-designed in 2000. This design reflects the three pillars of the identity, Ireland, Edinburgh and Leith. Geography rather than religion is now seen as the reason for supporting Hibs. Hibs had some success after being reformed, winning the 1902 Scottish Cup, after this, however, the club endured a long barren spell. The club lost its placing in the league, and were relegated for the first time in 1931, the notorious Scottish Cup drought began as they reached three cup finals, two in consecutive years, but lost each of them

6. Dundee United F.C. – Dundee United Football Club is a Scottish professional football club based in the city of Dundee. Formed in 1909, originally as Dundee Hibernian, the changed to the present name in 1923. United are nicknamed The Terrors or The Tangerines and the supporters are known as Arabs, the club has played in tangerine kits since the 1960s and have played at the present ground, Tannadice Park, since their foundation in 1909. United were founder members of the Scottish Premier League in 1998 and were ever-present in the competition until it was abolished in 2013 to make way for the SPFL structure, United were relegated in 2016 to the Scottish Championship, which is the second tier of the SPFL. Domestically, the club has won the Scottish Premier Division on one occasion, the Scottish Cup twice, United appeared in European competition for the first time in the 1966–67 season, going on to appear in Europe in 14 successive seasons from 1976. They also reached the European Cup semi-finals in 1984 and the UEFA Cup final in 1987, the club has a 100% record in four matches against Barcelona in competitive European ties. The club was formed as Dundee Hibernian in 1909, playing from the outset at Tannadice Park and they were voted into the Scottish Football League in 1910. After being saved from going out of business in October 1923, between 1925 and 1932 United were promoted and then relegated three times, winning the Second Division title in 1925 and 1929. The club achieved little success until Jerry Kerr became manager in 1959. Kerrs team won promotion in his first season in charge and became established in the top flight, Jim McLean took over from Kerr in 1971 and his youth policy led to the most successful era in the clubs history. United won the Scottish League Cup in 1979 and 1980 and then the Premier Division title in 1982–83, the club were also successful in Europe, reaching the European Cup semi-finals in 1984 and the 1987 UEFA Cup Final. The latter featuring another elimination of Barcelona, despite losing to IFK Gothenburg in the final, the club won a FIFA Fair Play Award. McLean retired as manager in 1993, but remained as club chairman, United won the Scottish Cup for the first time in 1994 under McLeans successor Ivan Golac, but were relegated in 1995, returning a year later. Shortly after Leveins departure, the won the Scottish Cup for a second time in 2010 under the management of Peter Houston. After several relatively successful seasons, a slump in form led to United being relegated in 2016, for a complete pictorial history of playing kit, see the Historical Football Kits site. After persuasion by the wife of manager Jerry Kerr, the colour would soon be adopted as the own in 1969 to give the club a brighter. The new colour was paraded for the first time in a friendly against Everton in August. When founded as Dundee Hibernian, they had followed the example of clubs of similar heritage by adopting the traditionally Irish colours of green shirts

7. Airdrieonians F.C. (1878) – Airdrieonians Football Club, more commonly known as Airdrie, were a Scottish professional football team from the town of Airdrie, in the Monklands area of Lanarkshire. During their 124-year existence the Diamonds, as they were nicknamed, the club also competed in four separate Scottish Cup finals, winning the competition in 1924. Airdrieonians were the first club in the Scottish League to fold since 1967, the team was founded in Airdrie, North Lanarkshire in 1878 as Excelsior Football Club, changing its name to Airdrieonians in 1881. It was elected to the Scottish Football League in 1894, the club enjoyed its most successful era in the 1920s, following the signing of Hughie Gallacher from Queen of the South in 1921. Airdrie challenged the dominance of Rangers, as finished in second place in the Scottish League championship four years in a row between 1923 and 1926 and won the Scottish Cup in 1924. Following this victory, in early summer 1925, the club visited Norway and Sweden, translations of local newspaper reports, and some photographs of the tour, are still available. This successful era came to an end after Gallacher and Bob McPhail were sold to Newcastle United, Airdrie spent much of the post war era yo-yoing between the top flight and Second Division. Airdrie entered the first Texaco Cup competition in 1970–71, defeating Nottingham Forest in the first round and that tie was decided by a penalty shootout and Airdrie became the first Scottish club to be involved in that method of deciding a contest. Airdrie reached the Texaco Cup Final in 1972, losing 2–1 on aggregate to Derby County and they also reached the 1975 Scottish Cup Final, losing 3–1 to Celtic. After the leagues were restructured in 1975, a called the Spring Cup was instituted for the teams in the lower divisions. Airdrie won this competition in 1976, but it was discontinued after one season as clubs preferred to play league games instead. MacDonald also guided the Diamonds to two Scottish Cup Finals, the first appearance coming on 9 May 1992 when the club faced Rangers in front of 44,045 strong crowd at Hampden Park. Unfortunately for Airdrie on this however, a goal each from Mark Hateley. Although Airdrie lost in the 1992 Scottish Cup Final they had qualified for the 1992–93 European Cup Winners Cup. Airdrie were drawn against Czech side Sparta Prague in the first round, Airdrie lost 1–0 at Broomfield and 2–1 in Prague, losing 3–1 on aggregate. Kenny Black, who went on to become manager of Airdrie United, scored the only Airdrie goal. Airdrie also reached the 1995 Scottish Cup Final, where they faced the other half of the Old Firm, Airdrie would once again fall at the final hurdle, as they lost 1–0 to a Pierre van Hooijdonk goal. Airdrie also won the Scottish Challenge Cup in 1994–95, Airdrie sold their Broomfield home to Safeway in 1994, but had to groundshare with Clyde at Broadwood Stadium for four years until the Excelsior Stadium was opened

8. Meadowbank Thistle F.C. – Livingston Football Club, is a Scottish football club based in Livingston, West Lothian. Livingston currently play in the Scottish League One and were founded in 1943 as Ferranti Thistle, the club was admitted to the Scottish Football League and renamed as Meadowbank Thistle in 1974, and played its matches at Meadowbank Stadium in Edinburgh. In 1995, the club was relocated to Livingston, West Lothian, since then Livingston have played their home games at the Almondvale Stadium. However, the club hit financial problems in 2004, and was relegated to the Scottish First Division in 2006, in July 2009 the club faced further financial problems and were on the verge of suffering a liquidation event before a deal was struck. Livingston were subsequently demoted to the Scottish Third Division, but the club achieved consecutive promotions, the club began life as Ferranti Amateurs in 1943. A works team of the Ferranti engineering company, they played in the Edinburgh FAs Amateur Second Division. During this period the club won the East of Scotland Qualifying Cup in 1963, in 1969 the club moved to the City Park ground in Edinburgh. In 1972 the club members of SFA which allowed them to enter the Scottish Qualifying Cup which they won in 1973 which previously had not been open to them. The clubs first match in the Scottish Cup was on 16 December 1972 against Duns. In 1974, as a result of the demise of Third Lanark seven years earlier, after beating off competition from four Highland League sides, Hawick Royal Albert and Gateshead United, Ferranti Thistle were accepted into the league by a vote of 21–16 over Inverness Thistle. The local council offered use of Meadowbank Stadium, a stadium built in 1970. After an Edinburgh Evening News campaign to find a name for the club and this was approved by the SFL in time for the new season. Having had little time to form a squad from the existing Ferranti squad, Meadowbank played their first competitive match in the League Cup, eventually losing 1–0 to Albion Rovers. In 1983 the club achieved promotion to the First Division but ultimately were relegated back to the Second Division at the end of the 1984–85 season, in the 1986–87 season, Meadowbank won the Second Division championship and won promotion to the First Division. They finished runners-up in the First Division in the following season, the part-time club began to struggle, and it became a limited company in 1993 but was relegated a short time after at the end of the 1992–93 season to the Second Division. Meadowbank suffered a relegation in 1994–95, finishing second from bottom in the Second Division. After this, Chairman Bill Hunter claimed Meadowbank had run into financial difficulties and were facing closure as a result. C. In their first season as Livingston they were crowned champions of the Third Division for the 1995–96 season, Three years later, in 1998–99, they won promotion again as Second Division champions

9. Spartans F.C. – The Spartans Football Club are a Scottish football club from Edinburgh. They are managed by Dougie Samuel and they were formed in 1951 by ex-players of Edinburgh University and the original intention was to field a team of graduates of the university. However, they have players from elsewhere as well and they play at Ainslie Park and wear white shirts, red shorts and white socks. The senior team plays in the Lowland Football League and they joined the new league in 2013 after playing in the East of Scotland Football League, where they became one of its most successful clubs from the 1970s. They have been allowed to play in the rounds of the Scottish Cup since 1978 and have qualified for the cup proper on several occasions. Spartans had their top amateur side accepted into the set up in 2009. In their first season, they finished 2nd, just two points off the top slot and only promotion place, Spartans also have an under 20 squad who are managed by Les Atkinson. Spartans had an East of Scotland side up until season 15/16 managed by Colin Tomassi, Spartans have a very successful academy. They then defeated Arbroath 4–1 at Gayfield Park in the third round, two seasons later in 2005–06, Spartans defeated Berwick Rangers, Lossiemouth and Queens Park in the first three rounds of the Scottish Cup. They drew 0–0 with First Division side St Mirren in the last sixteen in front of 3,326 fans at City Park, earning a replay at Love Street, where they lost 3–0. In the 2008–09 Scottish Cup, Spartans cup run sent them to Pollok, winning through a replay, in the next round they beat Elgin City 2–1, before being knocked out by Airdrie United in the fourth round. Spartans, along with four clubs, submitted an application for entry into the Scottish Football League following Gretna relinquishing their league status on 3 June 2008. Spartans lost out to Annan Athletic, in November 2008, Spartans moved to a new purpose-built home at Ainslie Park, situated 500 yards from City Park in the Crewe Toll district of Edinburgh. The new facility includes a 504-seater stand and floodlights surrounding the stadium pitch. Ainslie Park is now used daily by youth and adult Spartans teams, the club also won the league title this season. In the 2009–10 season, Spartans won the quadruple, consisting of the East of Scotland Premier Division, the SFA South Challenge Cup, the King Cup, the 2009–10 league title gave Spartans back to back title wins for the first time since 2005. During the 2010–11 season, Spartans won their league title in a row. The next season they lost the title on goal difference to Stirling University

10. Association football – Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played between two teams of eleven players with a spherical ball. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies making it the worlds most popular sport, the game is played on a rectangular field with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by getting the ball into the opposing goal, players are not allowed to touch the ball with their hands or arms while it is in play, unless they are goalkeepers. Other players mainly use their feet to strike or pass the ball, the team that scores the most goals by the end of the match wins. If the score is level at the end of the game, the Laws of the Game were originally codified in England by The Football Association in 1863. Association football is governed internationally by the International Federation of Association Football, the first written reference to the inflated ball used in the game was in the mid-14th century, Þe heued fro þe body went, Als it were a foteballe. The Online Etymology Dictionary states that the word soccer was split off in 1863, according to Partha Mazumdar, the term soccer originated in England, first appearing in the 1880s as an Oxford -er abbreviation of the word association. Within the English-speaking world, association football is now usually called football in the United Kingdom and mainly soccer in Canada and the United States. People in Australia, Ireland, South Africa and New Zealand use either or both terms, although national associations in Australia and New Zealand now primarily use football for the formal name. According to FIFA, the Chinese competitive game cuju is the earliest form of football for which there is scientific evidence, cuju players could use any part of the body apart from hands and the intent was kicking a ball through an opening into a net. It was remarkably similar to football, though similarities to rugby occurred. During the Han Dynasty, cuju games were standardised and rules were established, phaininda and episkyros were Greek ball games. An image of an episkyros player depicted in low relief on a vase at the National Archaeological Museum of Athens appears on the UEFA European Championship Cup, athenaeus, writing in 228 AD, referenced the Roman ball game harpastum. Phaininda, episkyros and harpastum were played involving hands and violence and they all appear to have resembled rugby football, wrestling and volleyball more than what is recognizable as modern football. As with pre-codified mob football, the antecedent of all football codes. Non-competitive games included kemari in Japan, chuk-guk in Korea and woggabaliri in Australia, Association football in itself does not have a classical history. Notwithstanding any similarities to other games played around the world FIFA have recognised that no historical connection exists with any game played in antiquity outside Europe. The modern rules of football are based on the mid-19th century efforts to standardise the widely varying forms of football played in the public schools of England

11. Scottish Football League – The Scottish Football League was a league featuring professional and semi-professional football clubs mostly from Scotland. From its foundation in 1890 until the breakaway Scottish Premier League was formed in 1998, after 1998, the SFL represented levels 2 to 4 of the Scottish football league system. In June 2013, the SFL merged with the SPL to form the Scottish Professional Football League, the SFL was associated with a title sponsor from the 1985–86 season. As this sponsor has changed over the years the league was known in turn as the Fine Fare League, B&Q League, Bells Scottish Football League, the SFL also organised two knock-out cup competitions, the Scottish League Cup and the Scottish Challenge Cup. Organised football in Scotland began in 1873 with the formation of the Scottish Football Association, during the next 15 years or so, clubs would play friendly matches, Scottish Cup ties and local cup ties. The Football League, initially containing clubs from the North West and this had been done in response to the professionalisation of football in England in 1885, with the regular diet of league fixtures replacing the haphazard arrangement of friendlies. Many Scottish players, known as the Scotch Professors, moved to the English league clubs to receive the high salaries on offer. This prompted Scottish clubs into thinking about forming their own league, in March 1890, the secretary of Renton wrote to thirteen other clubs inviting them to discuss the organisation of a league. All of the clubs accepted the invitation, except Queens Park and these concerns were to prove well-founded, as six of the founder members would leave the league before 1900. The Scottish Football League was inaugurated on 30 April 1890, the first season of competition, 1890–91, commenced with 11 clubs because St Bernards were not elected. The eleven original clubs in membership were Abercorn, Cambuslang, Celtic, Cowlairs, Dumbarton, Heart of Midlothian, Rangers, Renton, St Mirren, Third Lanark and Vale of Leven. Renton were expelled five games of the 1890–91 season for playing against St Bernards. Renton raised an action against the SFA in the Court of Session and won, in the 1890–91 season, Rangers and Dumbarton were level at the top of the league on 29 points. The teams drew 2–2 in a match, but no further thought had been given to separating teams by another method. Goal average was introduced for the 1921–22 season and replaced by goal difference for the 1971–72 season, the league proved to be highly successful, and in 1893 a Second Division was formed by the inclusion of a number of clubs previously in the Scottish Football Alliance. Promotion was initially based on a ballot of clubs, automatic promotion was not introduced until 1922, in 1923, the League decided to introduce a Third Division. The Western Football League was used as its backbone but the new set-up lasted only three years before it collapsed under heavy financial losses, from 1926 until 1946, the League returned to two divisions. Post-World War II reforms saw the League resume with three divisions, postwar seasons saw the divisions renamed A, B and C with the last section also including reserve sides

12. Livingston F.C. – Livingston Football Club, is a Scottish football club based in Livingston, West Lothian. Livingston currently play in the Scottish League One and were founded in 1943 as Ferranti Thistle, the club was admitted to the Scottish Football League and renamed as Meadowbank Thistle in 1974, and played its matches at Meadowbank Stadium in Edinburgh. In 1995, the club was relocated to Livingston, West Lothian, since then Livingston have played their home games at the Almondvale Stadium. However, the club hit financial problems in 2004, and was relegated to the Scottish First Division in 2006, in July 2009 the club faced further financial problems and were on the verge of suffering a liquidation event before a deal was struck. Livingston were subsequently demoted to the Scottish Third Division, but the club achieved consecutive promotions, the club began life as Ferranti Amateurs in 1943. A works team of the Ferranti engineering company, they played in the Edinburgh FAs Amateur Second Division. During this period the club won the East of Scotland Qualifying Cup in 1963, in 1969 the club moved to the City Park ground in Edinburgh. In 1972 the club members of SFA which allowed them to enter the Scottish Qualifying Cup which they won in 1973 which previously had not been open to them. The clubs first match in the Scottish Cup was on 16 December 1972 against Duns. In 1974, as a result of the demise of Third Lanark seven years earlier, after beating off competition from four Highland League sides, Hawick Royal Albert and Gateshead United, Ferranti Thistle were accepted into the league by a vote of 21–16 over Inverness Thistle. The local council offered use of Meadowbank Stadium, a stadium built in 1970. After an Edinburgh Evening News campaign to find a name for the club and this was approved by the SFL in time for the new season. Having had little time to form a squad from the existing Ferranti squad, Meadowbank played their first competitive match in the League Cup, eventually losing 1–0 to Albion Rovers. In 1983 the club achieved promotion to the First Division but ultimately were relegated back to the Second Division at the end of the 1984–85 season, in the 1986–87 season, Meadowbank won the Second Division championship and won promotion to the First Division. They finished runners-up in the First Division in the following season, the part-time club began to struggle, and it became a limited company in 1993 but was relegated a short time after at the end of the 1992–93 season to the Second Division. Meadowbank suffered a relegation in 1994–95, finishing second from bottom in the Second Division. After this, Chairman Bill Hunter claimed Meadowbank had run into financial difficulties and were facing closure as a result. C. In their first season as Livingston they were crowned champions of the Third Division for the 1995–96 season, Three years later, in 1998–99, they won promotion again as Second Division champions

13. Edinburgh University – The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1582, is the sixth oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotlands ancient universities. The university is deeply embedded in the fabric of the city of Edinburgh, the University of Edinburgh was ranked 17th and 21st in the world by the 2014–15 and 2015-16 QS rankings. It is now ranked 19th in the according to 2016-17 QS Rankings. It is ranked 16th in the world in arts and humanities by the 2015–16 Times Higher Education Ranking and it is ranked the 23rd most employable university in the world by the 2015 Global Employability University Ranking. It is ranked as the 6th best university in Europe by the U. S. News Best Global Universities Ranking and it is a member of both the Russell Group, and the League of European Research Universities, a consortium of 21 research universities in Europe. It has the third largest endowment of any university in the United Kingdom, after the universities of Cambridge and it continues to have links to the British Royal Family, having had the Duke of Edinburgh as its Chancellor from 1953 to 2010 and Princess Anne since 2011. Edinburgh receives approximately 50,000 applications every year, making it the fourth most popular university in the UK by volume of applicants, after St Andrews, it is the most difficult university to gain admission into in Scotland, and 9th overall in the UK. This was a move at the time, as most universities were established through Papal bulls. Established as the Tounis College, it opened its doors to students in October 1583, instruction began under the charge of another St Andrews graduate Robert Rollock. It was the fourth Scottish university in a period when the more populous. It was renamed King Jamess College in 1617, by the 18th century, the university was a leading centre of the Scottish Enlightenment. The universitys first custom-built building was the Old College, now Edinburgh Law School and its first forte in teaching was anatomy and the developing science of surgery, from which it expanded into many other subjects. From the basement of a nearby house ran the anatomy tunnel corridor and it went under what was then North College Street, and under the university buildings until it reached the universitys anatomy lecture theatre, delivering bodies for dissection. It was from this tunnel the body of William Burke was taken after he had been hanged, towards the end of the 19th century, Old College was becoming overcrowded and Robert Rowand Anderson was commissioned to design new Medical School premises in 1875. The medical school was more or less built to his design and was completed by the addition of the McEwan Hall in the 1880s. The building now known as New College was originally built as a Free Church college in the 1840s and has been the home of divinity at the university since the 1920s. The two oldest schools – law and divinity – are both well-esteemed, with law being based in Old College and divinity in New College on the Mound and they are also represented by the Edinburgh University Sports Union which was founded in 1866. The medical school is renowned throughout the world and it was widely considered the best medical school in the English-speaking world throughout the 18th century and first half of the 19th century

14. Scottish Cup – The Scottish Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the Scottish Cup, is an annual association football knock-out cup competition for mens football clubs in Scotland. The competition was first held in 1873–74, entry is open to all clubs with full or associate membership of the Scottish Football Association. The competition is called the William Hill Scottish Cup for sponsorship reasons and it was first presented to Queens Park, who won the final match of the inaugural tournament in March 1874. The current holder is Hibernian, who won the tournament for the time by defeating Rangers 3–2 in the 2016 final. The tournament starts at the beginning of the Scottish football season in August or September, the Scottish Cup Final is usually the last game of the season, taking place at the end of May. Participating teams enter the tournament at different stages depending on their league ranking, the lowest ranked clubs enter the tournament at the first round whilst the highest ranked, those that compete in the Scottish Premiership, enter at the fourth round stage. The competition is a knock-out tournament, in each round of games the teams are paired at random, with the first team drawn listed as the home team. Every game lasts 90 minutes plus any additional stoppage time, the winner of each game advances to the next round, whilst the loser is eliminated from the tournament. If a game ends in a draw, the fixture is replayed at the ground of the other team at a later date. If the replay also ends in a draw,30 minutes of time is played followed by a penalty shoot-out if there is still no clear winner. In the semi-final and final rounds, if the ends in a draw there is no replay. The competition has a staggered entry system, Scottish League One and six Scottish Championship clubs started in the third round, while the remaining four Championship clubs and all 12 Scottish Premiership clubs entered in the fourth round. Any club that is a full or associate member of the Scottish Football Association is entitled to compete in the tournament, every team that plays in the Scottish Professional Football League is therefore eligible. Between 1895 and 2007, clubs that were SFA members but not competitors in the professional football leagues could only qualify for the tournament by winning the Scottish Qualifying Cup. Clubs that are not members of the SFA may still qualify for the tournament by winning the Highland League, Lowland League, three junior clubs, Banks O Dee, Girvan and Linlithgow Rose are also SFA members and therefore qualify automatically. From 2015, the winners of the Scottish Amateur Cup are also eligible to qualify, players that are registered with a competing club are eligible to play. However, players are not entitled to play for more than one club during the same tournament, each club names eleven players and up to five substitutes before every match. In order to play in the match, a player must have also been registered to compete in the semi-final round for the same club

15. East of Scotland Football League – The East of Scotland Football League is a league of football teams from south-east Scotland, which was formed in 1923. The league sits at level 6 on the system, on a par with the South of Scotland Football League and is proposed to act as a feeder to the Lowland Football League. Its clubs are drawn from the Edinburgh, Lothians and Scottish Borders areas. A total of 16 teams will compete in 2015–16, drawn from the 29 members of the sister organisation and this will be subject to the club meeting the sufficient licensing criteria to satisfy the terms of promotion. In 2013, a new Lowland League was formed covering all of Scotland, teams who also joined include Dalbeattie Star and Threave Rovers, who both subsequently left to rejoin the SoSFL and then the Lowland League. While the EoSFL oversees the leagues and League Cup competitions, the East of Scotland Football Association is an independent body. Most of the sit on both bodies, and the Executive Committee is a joint organisation. The current President of the EoSFA is Morain Scott, while the President of the EoSFL is Tom Allison, the secretary of both organisations is John Greenhorn. There are 29 members of the East of Scotland Football Association, the first teams of these four members have little involvement in EoSFA competitions. Youth teams of Hearts and Hibernian contest the East of Scotland Shield, while Berwick Rangers, the first teams of the Lowland League members contest EoSFA cups. The EoSFL and EoSFA are full members of the Scottish Football Association, the EoSFLs former two-tier format was abolished for the 2015–16 season, to be replaced with a single fifteen-team division. For 2016–17, the league consists of twelve teams, knock-out tournament, with replays until the semi-Finals and final. South Challenge Cup, This competition, new from the 2007–08 season and it is a straight knock-out tournament. The King Cup, Open to all EoSFA members not playing in the SPFL, the King Cup final is traditionally the last game of the season. East of Scotland Qualifying Leagues, A new competition from the 2011–12 season, Open to all 24 EoSFA members playing in the EoSFL. A pre-season warm-up competition, these clubs are split into four groups of six, East of Scotland League Cup, Group winners and runners-up from the East of Scotland Qualifying Leagues enter this straight knock-out competition. The East of Scotland Qualifying Cup, currently sponsored by Image Printers, all 20 EoSFA members playing in the EOSFL enter. The finalists join the first teams of Berwick Rangers and Livingston in the East of Scotland Cup, the 4 EoSFA members in the national leagues used to all enter, but now the Hearts and Hibernian reserve teams contest the East of Scotland Shield - albeit intermittently

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